Books read in 2016

January 10, 2017

I’ve always loved reading and for as long as I can remember, I’ve read at least a book a week. When I say I enjoy reading, most people say, ‘I don’t have time for that. I’m too busy.’ People assume that because I read a lot, then I must have loads of time on my hands. I don’t and I never read for more than 5 minutes at a go during the day. I just make the time, that’s all. It’s a question of priorities. Every spare moment, I read. While I wait for the kettle to boil, always in the loo, sometimes while cooking. If you can’t make space in your life for things you enjoy then what the hell is the point of living.

glowing-bookFor me, there is nothing more beautiful and instructive and magical as a novel. Books are revelations, private lessons, wells of beauty and pleasure. When I read, I feel like Alice in Wonderland tumbling down the rabbit hole. There is a special kind of sadness when you finish a great book. I always read about five books at the same time. I juggle and switch between them like a DJ spinning discs.

I love words. No other art form moves me as much as words. Words are my music. Read this excerpt from Gary Provost book and see what I mean:

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals–sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

So write with a combination of short, medium, and long sentences. Create a sound that pleases the reader’s ear. Don’t just write words. Write music.

Cool hey?

I’ve always devoured World War 2 books. I’m fascinated by how supposedly civilized Europe descended into such a dark and demonic period not even a hundred years ago. Both my grandfathers apparently had distressing experiences during the war and I have no clue what happened to either of them as they clammed up and never spoke to anyone in any detail about it. Over the past 10 years, there has been a wave of memoirs published as eyewitnesses are getting older and dying off and suddenly realising, ‘Oh shit. We should have told someone. This is important.’ This year I’ve been catching up on these books.

I find Holocaust stories strangely uplifting and inspiring. You can’t help but feel sane and blessed when you read true stories of extreme loss, starvation, terror, courage and endurance. World War 2 memoirs are some of the most extraordinary stories of courage, resistance and hope. I’ve learned from this topic that when everything else is destroyed, what you are and who you are and what you know are the things that count and they cannot be taken from you.

I still can’t fathom how ordinary people tolerated the Nazis and not only allowed them to do what they did, but actively participated in it. It was the Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn who said that ‘the line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either but right through every human heart.’ I believe we all have the same seeds in us, the same potential for evil in certain conditions and in certain circumstances.

The scary thing is that people are under the false impression that the Nazis were to blame for everything. They fail to realise that Hitler’s original plan was not to annihilate the Jews. He just wanted them out of Germany to make the place Jew-free. The Holocaust happened because no one else wanted the Jews. It was then that Hitler realised the world didn’t care. It was this failure to find a place for the Jews that prompted the Final Solution that killed 6 million of them. The Nazis played on anti-Semitic feelings that already existed throughout Europe, particularly in Poland which was virulently anti-Semitic. Did you know that the Jews are the most hated and persecuted people in history? I think Europe is still anti-Semitic but it is now more undercover and cloaked in that socially acceptable, politically correct form which is ‘Anti-Israel’. I have a soft spot for Jews, as you can tell.

Favourite books of 2016

My two favourite books for 2016 were … drumroll … ‘Escape from Sobibor’ by Richard Rashke and Trevor Noah’s memoir called ‘Born a Crime’. Escape from Sobibor is a riveting true story. It is absolutely mind blowing. The world would be a nicer place if everyone read that book. I will never forget it. I feel I am a better person for having read it.

Trevor Noah’s book was light and well-written and it brilliantly articulated racial issues in South Africa. I could relate to so much of what he said, albeit as an observer from the other, more privileged side of the racial fence.

Notable mentions

I’ve put the books I most enjoyed in red in the list below. Maggie O’Farrell is my favourite writer and her book ‘This must be the place’ was as absorbing as ever. I enjoyed Kuki Gallmann’s ‘I dreamed of Africa’ and I read some good psychological thrillers by BA Paris and Tammy Cohen. Paula Daly’s ‘Keep your friends close’ was excellent escapism.  Jane Fallon’s ‘Strictly between us’ was light and fun and Sarah Morgan’s romantic contemporary fiction provided some fluffy, mindless relief after the heavier World War 2 fare.

Thomas Friedman’s new book was very educational and stimulating. It was interesting to learn the extent to which climate change acts as the amplifier of today’s political challenges such as economic migrants, interethnic conflicts and extremism.  I didn’t realize that climate change was one of the main factors in the Syrian civil war. Before the war began, Syria suffered the worst drought in its modern history and the government did nothing to help. This was a critical stressor that fuelled the uprising. Fascinating and also scary because Donald Trump thinks climate change isn’t a big deal. Oh boy.

Anyway, here is my list:

  1. Orphan Train by CHRISTINA BAKER KLINE
  2. Rumours by FREYA NORTH
  3. After Auschwitz: A story of heartbreak and survival by the stepsister of Anne Frank by EVA SCHLOSS
  4. Hanns and Rudolf: The German Jew and the Hunt for the Kommandant of Auschwitz by THOMAS HARDING
  5. Black Rabbit Hall by EVE CHASE
  6. Sleigh Bells in the Snow by SARAH MORGAN
  7. Suddenly Last Summer by SARAH MORGAN
  8. Maybe this Christmas by SARAH MORGAN
  9. The House by the Lake: A Story of Germany by THOMAS HARDING
  10. Five Chimneys: A Woman Survivor’s True Story of Auschwitz by OLGA LENGYEL
  11. Some Kind of Wonderful by SARAH MORGAN
  12. First Time in Forever by SARAH MORGAN
  13. Christmas Ever After by SARAH MORGAN
  14. Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by ALFRED LANSING
  15. The Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy by THOMAS BUERGENTHAL
  16. Sleepless in Manhattan by SARAH MORGAN
  17. Summer Kisses by SARAH MORGAN
  18. A Rose from the Ashes by ROSE PRICE
  19. Christ in the Passover by CEIL AND MOISHE ROSEN
  20. Playing by the Greek’s Rules by SARAH MORGAN
  21. Doukakis’s Apprentice by SARAH MORGAN
  22. The Nazi Officer’s Wife by EDITH HAHN BEER
  23. Wine by CARO FEELY
  24. On Hitler’s Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood by IRMGARD HUNT
  25. Hitler’s Last Witness: Memoirs of Hitler’s Bodyguard by ROCHUS MISCH
  26. Strictly Between Us by JANE FALLON
  27. Behind Closed Doors by BA PARIS
  28. He was my Chief: Memoir’s of Adolf Hitler’s Secretary by CHRISTA SCHROEDER
  29. Before She was Bad by TAMMY COHEN
  30. Getting Rid of Matthew by JANE FALLON
  31. Anne Frank Remembered by MIEP GIES
  32. The Girl in the Green Sweater by KRYSTYNA CHIGER
  33. La Trahison d’Alekos Zakorokis by SARAH MORGAN
  34. The Big Short by MICHEAL LEWIS
  35. This Must Be The Place by MAGGIE O’FARRELL
  36. Un Epoux Inattendu by ANNE MCALLISTER
  37. Night by ELIE WIESEL
  38. First One Missing by TAMMY COHEN
  39. Treblinka: A Survivor’s Memory by CHIL RAJCHMAN
  40. Clara’sWar by CLARA KRAMER
  41. In the Garden of Beasts by ERIK LARSON
  42. The Pianist by WLADYSLAW SZPILMAN
  43. I Will Plant you a Lilac Tree by LAURA HILLMAN
  44. The Boy on the Wooden Box by LEON LEYSON
  45. The Stranger on the Road to Emmaus by JOHN R CROSS
  46. The News by ALAIN DE BOTTON
  47. Alicia by ALICIA APPLEMAN
  48. Un si Seduisant Milliardaire by EMMA DARCY
  49. The Joe Rubinstein Story by NANCY SPROWELL GEISE
  50. Into that Darkness by GITTA SERENY
  51. Escape from Sobibor by RICHARD RASHKE
  52. Sunset in Central Park by SARAH MORGAN
  53. Story of a Secret State by JAN KARSKI
  54. I Found You by LISA JEWELL
  55. 100 Ways to Improve your Writing by GARY PROVOST
  56. Le Plus Parfait des Amants by JOSS WOOD
  57. I See You by CLARE MACINTOSH
  58. The Hell of it All by CHARLIE BROOKER
  59. Eyewitness Auschwitz by FILIP MULLER
  60. Boy by ROALD DAHL
  61. I Dreamed of Africa by KUKI GALLMANN
  62. Going Solo by ROALD DAHL
  63. The Silver Sword by IAN SERRAILLIER
  64. Goodnight Mister Tom by MICHELLE MAGORIAN
  65. Got You Back by JANE FALLON
  66. Foursome by JANE FALLON
  67. Fascinee par un seducteur by SHARON KENDRICK
  68. Truly Madly Guilty by LIANE MORIARTY
  69. Miracle on 5th Avenue by SARAH MORGAN
  70. Freres de Sang by MIKAEL OLLIVIER
  71. Test of Courage by MICHEL THOMAS/CHRISTOPHER ROBBINS
  72. Youth in Flames by ALIZIA VITIS-SHOMRON
  73. The Bravest Battle by DAN KURZMAN
  74. A Painted Ocean by GABRIEL PACKARD
  75. Golden Fox by WILBUR SMITH
  76. Born a Crime by TREVOR NOAH
  77. Un Aigle dans La Neige by MICHAEL MORPURGO
  78. The Final Curtsey by MARGARET RHODES
  79. Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to the Future By THOMAS FRIEDMAN
  80. The Mistake I Made by PAULA DALY
  81. Keep your Friends Close by PAULA DALY
  82. What Kind of Mother are You? by PAULA DALY